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Garbage disposal connection has water in it

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MichMich

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Hi there.
Quick question.
Is it normal that the garbage disposal output pipe has water in it? My dishwasher is few months old. Works like gold. Drains water completely. At least I don't see it at the bottom of the dishwasher. Zero water. Should I worry?
 

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Geofd

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Hi there.
Quick question.
Is it normal that the garbage disposal output pipe has water in it? My dishwasher is few months old. Works like gold. Drains water completely. At least I don't see it at the bottom of the dishwasher. Zero water. Should I worry?
usually when the disposal is holding water the drain going into the wall is higher than normal a pic of the drain in the wall and the disposal would be great
 
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frodo

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right here right now, over there later on.
Better yet, install a dishwasher air gap on the sink top and have it safely do what is designed to do.
This is the only thing that you and I seem to have differing opinions on.
If the hose it tied up high. Better yet, drilled hole is up high
the water runs back to the disposal where the air break is located
 

havasu

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Just to help some viewers who may have become confused, both Breplum and Frodo are correct. In states such as California, a true air gap is required. The state where Frodo lives, it is not required. I live in California, have a beautiful chunk of granite installed in my kitchen, and refuse to have that unsightly air gap exposed next to my sink, so I chose a high loop discharge. I also had 4 local inspectors survey my home when purchasing it, and not one inspector mentioned the air gap missing.

Here is an article I found on the web, which may help put this debate to bed, once and for all...

Though a high loop is a classic and effective method of backflow prevention, it is not as safe as an air gap. A high loop cannot assure back siphonage prevention. When the water pressure on the supply side drops significantly, water flow can reverse and the dishwasher drain line can suction dirty water and bacteria into the appliance. For example, if you have a double sink in your kitchen and they are draining simultaneously, this could cause a pressure differential that could lead the dishwasher to siphon water back into it through the drain line. There’s also the risk of the high loop becoming loose and sagging or poor installation rendering it ineffectual. However, high loops are popular, inexpensive to install and have proven to be reliable backflow prevention methods. If you opt not to install a dishwasher air gap, a high loop is the best alternative.
 

breplum

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"not stand for" types, frodo, I've had many.
Presidents/CEOs of very big companies, utility companies etc...
Doesn't matter what they "want".
We are licensed in the state, and fulfill our legal obligation to execute the codes which are written to protect public health.
 
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