Galvanized Drains to PVC Drains

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JohnnyStorm

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I would have to tie the sink and shower into the stack some where not into the outlet on the toilet 90°. I would assume the nipple screwed into the toilet rotted and that is why the fernco is there. If it were me i would be starting over and try to find a spot on the stack to tie into and cut that toilet 90 out and run new pvc. Unfortunately it will probably be a larger project than you wanted to get into. I believe it will be in your best interest for the long term to get all that old galvy out of there, it looks like a ticking time bomb to me
You were right about that being rotted. I couldn't get it out so I just left it there.
 

JohnnyStorm

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Well, you are making a nice dent in the crap pile for sure.
You can get 22.5 degree elbows also, and 11.25 degree.
Maybe in long sweeps, more gentle?
That would help eliminate the bendy stuff.
Some of them are available as a “street” elbow, meaning one end has no socket, it is the same outlet size as regular pipe, so sometimes easier to connect direct to solvent fittings or clamp couplings.
Maybe you could also use flex pvc, sometimes called spa flex, don’t know if it is legal for drains.
It has a natural gentle built in curve to it
If you use it, use schedule 40 fittings, the socket is twice as deep and gives a much better solvent glue joint.
Or use shielded couplings.
Pros can advise if legal behind walls or for drain plumbing.
I have used it for buried two inch pressure lines for garden pond waterfalls.
Maybe close up the wall with something temporary like fiberglass or masonite bath panels, so you can get back in there if anything fails, or to continue removing old junk like the galvanized water pipes.
WOW I didn't realize there was anything other than 90 and 45s OKAY this is great. That should definitely work! AND great idea about the masonite / fiberglass. THANKS!!
 

Aloha Mark

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... I'm starting to think it was a bad Idea to get this place... Hopefully it all works out
If a woman is involved in the purchase of the place, and you convinced her to buy it, she will always remind you it was a really BAD idea to get the place. You have more than just a plumbing problem. First, you're in NY which has pretty strict plumbing codes. Assuming the plumber can get away with a PVC run, this is what he will recommend. My wife had to shell out four grand to get a cast iron stack replaced in a two story home in PA. Plumber had to cut out the old stack and replace it with PVC. Walls had to be cut out on the first and second floor. Cleanout port was in the basement, and was connected to the PVC using a flexible coupling and clamps. That part of the repair is not covered. I really do not like flexible coupling hidden behind walls (just my personal opinion).

Your problem entails not just plumbing but potentially woodwork and wall work. Get a carpenter into the place and ask him whether sister boards will help. I would be very wary of any 2x4 (and higher dimension) boards being exposed to water. The drying out process is lengthy. Make sure the tile guy uses Hardie Backerboard, or equivalent.

Have you gotten any estimates for the full repair job?
 

Twowaxhack

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I find that places with super strict plumbing codes are where you see most of the handyman crap work. Some of the worst plumbing I’ve ever seen was in Chicago snd New York.

With the strict codes and many regulations comes high prices......with high prices you’ve made a better market for the handyman.
 

TomFOhio

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Alrighty here's what I have now.. this is my first time dealing with anything more than a faucet so... I'm learning. It was 2am and I had to get this done and stop the leak so that bendable straw pvc had to stay for now.. I tried a couple 45 elbows but I just could not get it to line up... Not perfect but alot better than it was, I think...Maybe I'll try again next week because I'd rather have a clean smooth setup. Anyway thanks again for everyone's help and input!
View attachment 31046
Johnny, I got to give you credit for trying but if you fill up that bath tub and let it out to drain the water is going to go straight through that tee
that you put in. I don't know how to draw on the computer but hopefully one of these guys on here that do know how will show you the correct
way to pipe that tub and I think the lav with that flexible line.
 

JohnnyStorm

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Got caught up with an emergency leak on the roof... It's been a wild ride! @TomFOhio forgive my lack of understanding but I through the water was suppose to go through the Tee. Also what do you mean by "Lav with that flexible line"? Again my plumbing knowledge is equivalent to a toddler so I'm just trying to grasp as much knowledge as I can. Thanks!
 

JohnnyStorm

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If a woman is involved in the purchase of the place, and you convinced her to buy it, she will always remind you it was a really BAD idea to get the place. You have more than just a plumbing problem. First, you're in NY which has pretty strict plumbing codes. Assuming the plumber can get away with a PVC run, this is what he will recommend. My wife had to shell out four grand to get a cast iron stack replaced in a two story home in PA. Plumber had to cut out the old stack and replace it with PVC. Walls had to be cut out on the first and second floor. Cleanout port was in the basement, and was connected to the PVC using a flexible coupling and clamps. That part of the repair is not covered. I really do not like flexible coupling hidden behind walls (just my personal opinion).

Your problem entails not just plumbing but potentially woodwork and wall work. Get a carpenter into the place and ask him whether sister boards will help. I would be very wary of any 2x4 (and higher dimension) boards being exposed to water. The drying out process is lengthy. Make sure the tile guy uses Hardie Backerboard, or equivalent.

Have you gotten any estimates for the full repair job?
YEah definitely a large project here and ahead of me. I do a lot of remodeling work but never got involved with plumbing. A few of the studs and beams are pretty rotted smh
 
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