Flexible Reduction Coupling on a pressurized pipe

Discussion in 'Plumbing Building Code' started by Ami, Jul 6, 2017.

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  1. Jul 6, 2017 #1

    Ami

    Ami

    Ami

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    Hi all experts and thanks in advance for your help!

    I live in a downhill home. The pipe leading up to the street main sewer line is a 3" PVC, about 400ft long, with an elevation difference of about 40ft.

    ~2 Years ago, I had a professional plumber repair my sump pump float. They also replaced the last pipe section to the pump with a new check valve.
    They used a rubber reduction coupling (shown in attached photo) to connect the 3" main pipe to the 2" pump pipe.

    Last month, the coupling failed, and shifted out of place, causing a spill of the entire pipe content into my back yard. you can do the math, it's ~150 gallons... at ~17.5 PSI...

    My question is - is this coupling allowed by code to be used on pressurized lines?
    I see it (or very similar item) on home depot web site, where it explicitly says this is for DWV: http://www.homedepot.com/p/3-in-x-2-in-PVC-DWV-Mechanical-Flexible-Coupling-P1056-32/100372295

    It has now been replaced with a solid PVC, schedule 40 reduction coupling.

    If the plumber did commit a code violation, where is the relevant code section, and what do you think is the extension of the plumber's liability for this spill?

    Thank you for your thoughts!

    Ami

    IMG_2171.jpg
     
  2. Jul 6, 2017 #2

    Ami

    Ami

    Ami

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    I forgot to mention this is in Alameda county, Northern California.

    Thanks again,

    Ami
     
  3. Jul 6, 2017 #3

    CT-18

    CT-18

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    Are you saying you have a sewage lift station that pumps your sewer piping to the main sewer? We are only allowed to use shield rubber couplings here.
     
    Ami likes this.
  4. Jul 6, 2017 #4

    Ami

    Ami

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    Hi @CT-18 and thanks for your prompt reply.

    Yes - you are correct.

    Can you point me to the code section that states that you can only use shield rubber couplings for such setups?

    Thanks again and have a wonderful day!

    Ami
     
  5. Feb 21, 2018 #5

    TheRealTonyJ

    TheRealTonyJ

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    In Florida, that is totally fine. It really is a benefit to the owner and the tech working on the pump. If that thing failed, its from one of 3 reasons: Its really old, the tech didn't tighten it correctly, the discharge piping is too short (weight of the pump pulled it out of the fitting.

    It lasted over a year, no one will take liability for that. Most companies warrantee for only 1 year.

    If your pump does not rest solidly where it is placed, that needs to be corrected. Concrete blocks work wonders.

    Edit: looked at the picture again, that ball valve looks unnecessary for that installation. Can you post a picture directly down into the well, so we can see all the piping.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2018
  6. Feb 22, 2018 #6

    Ami

    Ami

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    Hi Tony and thanks for your thoughts.
    I ended up redoing the whole system from scratch, placing a new basin, pump and properly sized 1-1/4" pipe.
    The old metal basin was rusting out, and no longer sealed properly. The pump gave up, and so I decided to redo it.
    The ball valve is very much needed.
    Whenever you need to work on the pump, or in case the check valve fails, you need a way to prevent the fluid in the pipe from draining.
    That's a lot of fluid... I know...
    Thanks again,
    Ami
     
  7. Feb 23, 2018 #7

    TheRealTonyJ

    TheRealTonyJ

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    Awesome, I’m glad you were able to get it all upgraded and corrected!

    I totally understand the need for a stop valve, it just looked like it was on the wrong side of the fitting in the picture. If that fitting was where you disconnect the pump, the 3” pipe would dump on you. However, if there is another fitting upstream of that Fernco (a union or another Fernco) to disconnect the pump, that ball valve makes sense.
     
  8. Feb 28, 2018 #8

    frodo

    frodo

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    This is the information you asked for, california is under the UPC code
    No-Hub Couplings are often confused with Flexible Rubber couplings which are a much thicker walled rubber coupling with two stainless steel clamps but do not normally include a stainless steel shield. As defined in the Uniform Plumbing Code section 705.4.2. a mechanical joint shielded coupling for hubless cast-iron pipe and fittings shall have a metallic shield where installed above ground. Flexible rubber couplings with stainless steel clamps, without a shield, are designed for use below ground.

    if you show a picture of the sump piping we can help further
     

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