Black Pipe for gas - question

Discussion in 'Plumbing Building Code' started by MarkEB, Oct 21, 2019.

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  1. Oct 21, 2019 #1

    MarkEB

    MarkEB

    MarkEB

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    My house is on a slab. When I purchased the house the first floor ceiling was drop ceiling. I sheet rocked all the ceilings and recently I was told the propane supply line, which is the flexible copper type is not up to code, and I need to replace it. I want to use black pipe, running it from the outside, in my first floor ceiling, into my furnace room (about 15 feet). To make the job easier I want to use a larger section of plastic pipe as a "raceway" since it would be much easier to handle during the process of pushing it through the ceiling, parallel to the floor joists. After the plastic pipe is installed it would be very easy to push black pipe (one contiguous piece) through. Is this allowed? Thanks.
     
  2. Nov 3, 2019 #2

    Anti-wingnut

    Anti-wingnut

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    First of all, figure out the code status for yourself, don't rely on others spouting off.

    Second, figure out if it was in fact ever to code. The code status of copper gas supply is quite variable throughout the nation. It is likely that it was a safe and code compliant original installation. If that is the case, unless a compelling reason can be made for it now being unsafe, there is likely no reason to replace it.

    For instance, Seattle still allows copper pipe in new construction within certain caveats (403)
    http://www.seattle.gov/documents/Departments/SDCI/Codes/FuelGasCode/2012SFGCChapter4.pdf

    A salesmans most used and least understood words are "not to code"
     
  3. Nov 3, 2019 #3
  4. Nov 18, 2019 at 3:18 PM #4

    Mitchell-DIY-Guy

    Mitchell-DIY-Guy

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    Personally I'm not a fan of using soft copper for gas lines, code or no code: that's just me. All the gas line work I've seen in new homes using soft copper are pretty sloppy--wiggly copper running every which way. It's not neat, it's not tidy...but that's just me. I understand the goal of many is to do the least amount of work possible and appearance isn't a consideration. Builders especially trade off the extra cost of soft copper vs the extra labor of black iron...

    Most of the gas lines I see in homes around here (NE) are black iron. However, when looking at newer homes in the south (where I may move), I do see a lot of soft copper--all pretty slopping installs which is what bothers me.

    But one other thing I'm curious about and maybe a pro can weigh in here: in some of the homes I'm looking at, the gas line into the house is ~3/4" soft copper, and the gas feed is 2 psi. That goes to a manifold and there are "take offs" at 2 PSI, then there is a regulator, and the other side of the regulator has take offs at 1 PSI. The regulator takes the 2 PSI to 1 PSI. I've never seen this before--in all the older homes I've been in, in the NE and in the midwest, gas comes in at one pressure, and each appliance has a regulator (furnace, fireplace, hot water heater, etc.). So what's different in the south that requires two different gas feeds at two different pressures within a home? Can anyone tell me?
     

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