Bathroom remodel drain lines

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julaney

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The initial remodel of our 7x10 bathroom did not require moving any plumbing and we planned to DIY the entire project. Now that we have everything in, it is apparent that the old configuration will not work. We now need to move the bathtub, sink and toilet. The bathroom is gutted down to the floor joists. The crawl space provides easy access to the main sewer line that runs through the bathroom prior to exiting the house. We have installed water shut off valves and plan to replace the cooper pipe with PEX. While we are capable of installing water lines, bathtub, vanity, toilet and fixtures, we are not comfortable with the required sewer drain line modifications. The toilet will require splicing into the main sewer line just before it exits the house. The vent pipe will continue to exit through the same location in the roof but will need to be routed to the left of the tub valve and water lines. The tub and sink drain line will need to be installed including p traps. Because this is a log cabin, with exception to the vent pipe that will share the only wall with the tub filler, all sewer lines including p traps will be installed below the floor. We are ready to install the sub-floor but figured we get the plumbing estimates while everything is exposed. The existing plumbing drain lines are still in but can be removed with a single cut.
How much can we expect a plumber to charge for the required drain lines? I can't see how this will take an experience plumber more than 3 hours. My past experience with plumbing estimates has included major sticker shock. That is why we are now comfortable with installing fixtures and running water lines.



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jrogers99

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I just joined to post myself and read your post. I'm not a plumber but if you're comfortable like I am with the water lines, pex, fixtures, etc. then the sewer line is easy! No pressure in the line and hard to mess up...just has to flow down. I just re-plumbed my whole house from scratch and the sewer was the best part. I'd say to go for it. What I do see is either 3 or 4" PVC (we use ABS here in the SF Bay area) but I didn't think a plumber could use those short sweeps on the turns. I see in the bottom joint of 3" PVC a short sweep rather than a long sweep coming from somewhere under the floor. I'm surprised...I think those should always be long sweeps to help the flow. I see it again toward the top of the pic in what I assume is the vent but that can be a short sweep but I'm surprised it's not "rolled up" to the top of the pipe so it doesn't create a water block. There seems to be plenty of height.

Anyway, I know none of that was your question and I can't help with cost...because, like you, I do it all because it's too expensive no matter what. I'd just cut out that whole section and rework it where you need it. Hopefully there is a toilet still downline from it to use!! If there's not you have to be ready to do it all at once! Either way you go...good luck!
 

breplum

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Hey jrogers, Marc in Lafayette, CA here. Kinda close.
This will not be a complete critique, just a few offhand notes from a licensed contractor with over 40 yrs in plumbing.
There are Tees on their side = wrong. All codes require combos.
There are tees on their backs = wrong
The tub drain is using an S trap = wrong
Log cabin, or naught, get learnin' or get a licensed professional.
 

jrogers99

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Hey jrogers, Marc in Lafayette, CA here. Kinda close.
This will not be a complete critique, just a few offhand notes from a licensed contractor with over 40 yrs in plumbing.
There are Tees on their side = wrong. All codes require combos.
There are tees on their backs = wrong
The tub drain is using an S trap = wrong
Log cabin, or naught, get learnin' or get a licensed professional.
I am learning and this is helpful. I'm getting different answers though. I see the s trap because I know there is a minimum trap to "fall" distance to not be considered an "s" I just don't know what it is. However, I asked inspector about combos and long sweep and he said he preferred combos on the vertical drop and long sweeps were fine for a horizontal run change of direction. So, that's what I did on my house. I did recognize and think I said the tees were incorrect although I see with the one I called it a short sweep and I see there are other T's that should be rolled up instead of on their side. Thanks for the info!
 

julaney

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We are having a difficult time getting a plumber so we are moving forward with plans and will do the work ourselves if it comes to that. At this point the final configuration will be determined by the drains and vents required for a free standing tub, toilet and sink. As shown in the initial post, the existing constraints include log walls which cannot have any plumbing, a single internal wall which holds the vent stack that continues through the roof, maintaining entry and exit points for existing 3 inch line. I also plan to use the internal wall for the tub filler. All other plumbing will be in the existing crawl space which will require putting p traps for both the tub and the sink below the sub-floor (I know not allowed). The previous pedestal sink had the p trap below the sub-floor and we never had any problems. The entire crawl space is accessible. Please look at the initial design and provide any recommendations. The biggest challenge is venting each fixture. I really wanted to flip flop the vanity with the toilet but thought it would be really difficult to vent the toilet in that location. The tool I am using seems to think it is ok to run horizontal vents to the stack. I'm sure this is not optimal. Also the tool refuses to run a vent to the sink. Our kitchen sink has an Air Admittance Valve which works well so I guess we could do the same but would prefer vent to the stack if possible. Any recommendations would be appreciated.
 

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frodo

Just call me Macgyver
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right here right now, over there later on.
Where to put the side outlet tee?

orient the tee CENTER between the center of the sink and the center of the terlet
By doing this. it will cause the side outlet to be on a 45 degree angle with the bathroom.

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