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Backflow Valve

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timkins4292

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I posted previously about a septic smell in the house And got some answers. My kitchen sink (1.5”) runs a total of about 15’ before it ties in with the drain for my washing machine. After the tie in it continues for another 25’ to a 3” drain that dumps into a septic tank. Because the washer is in the basement I had to install a pump to pump the water up and out to where I mentioned it ties into the kitchen drain. The new pump is quite strong and I get water backing up the 15’ into the kitchen sink. Is there a backflow valve for 1.5” PVC that I can glue in line to stop the water backing up and this is on a vertical drain line. The other problem is this entire line is behind a finished wall and ceiling where I have had to cut a hole into with approximately 2’ of the drain exposed. WHEW!
 

timkins4292

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It’s all brand new installation. I had to do new install as it was tied into a dry well that had started to plug and the local zoning laws would not allow me to repair the dry well. I have been looking at various sites but have been unable to find a manufacturer for the back water valve. Any suggestions?
 

HWSleuth

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Why not install a ball valve on the pump line and throttle the pump‘s flow? Is there not enough room to install a check valve in the sink’s drain arm? The problems with a flapper type check valve is it will frequently stop up from kitchen sink waste and grease. Throttling the pump’s outlet flow is probably the best option.
 

Geofd

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Not sure if that would put stress on the pump because you would always be pumping against a restrictions out could also remove the check valve an install a ball valve on the sink line and leave it closed until you need to use it
 
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timkins4292

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Great observation and suggestion. I am worried most about putting a back water valve in a finished wall or ceiling. The ball valve under the sink may be the answer to the problem.
 

Jeff Handy

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Maybe change the laundry pump to a weaker pump?

However, I agree with a ball valve to throttle the existing pump.

I do that with pumps I install for garden pond waterfalls.

Some of them run half-choked day and night for seven months a year.
 

Jeff Handy

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What type of connection do you have, where the pump discharge joins the washer drain line?

Post a pic or two of that.

Maybe it’s just a tee, so pumped water is not being directed towards the septic?
 

Jeff Handy

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Some towns let you just dump gray water on the ground in back yard, or in garden beds.

That would be better for your septic tank.
 

timkins4292

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Zoning laws here prevent us from doing that. Thanks for the other replies, I am looking for the best option for ME.
 

Jeff Handy

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I prefer a stainless ball valve in that gray water situation, I think it would shed lint more easily.
 

RS

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I would think an ordinary check valve would do just fine, but it must be installed correctly, you would want a swing gate type, without any spring, and make sure the hinge is on top. There are lots of options available.

 

Stout Mechanical

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Zoning laws here prevent us from doing that. Thanks for the other replies, I am looking for the best option for ME.
There are only a few reasons for the laundry pump to back up into your kitchen line. Those are eithe the line is pitched wrong, the pump tie in is incorrect or the tie in to the 3” line is incorrect or you have a clog somewhere
 

timkins4292

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I would think an ordinary check valve would do just fine, but it must be installed correctly, you would want a swing gate type, without any spring, and make sure the hinge is on top. There are lots of options available.

If I were to install something like this, should it be in an accessible area and NOT behind a finished wall or ceiling?
 

Jeff Handy

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Yes, accessible for service when it clogs up, which will likely happen eventually.

It should have unions, or some type of rubber or shielded couplings, so you can take it out to clean it, and/or snake both ways from there.

You can put a plastic or metal access panel over the opening and paint it to match the existing wall.

I don’t know if a swing check valve or any check valve will work in a vertical line, with the pumped water coming at it from below, and the gravity drain sink water coming at it from above.

Sounds like it should be on a horizontal.

Pros can advise better.
 

Geofd

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Yes they can be installed in either direction if your gonna be in a wall
Your gonna need a large access panel
With a ball valve above a check valve with unions
 
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