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Old 12-18-2013, 03:12 AM   #1
Kieethes
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Default Layout and remodel help

Newb here needing some input. I bought my first house one year ago. I have done some upgrades, and now it is time to do the plumbing. My home was built in 48. It has galvanized pipes. I plan to convert to pex and a natural gas water heater hear in the next month. I have a few questions. Should I run two hot water main lines to the house from the utility room, where the WH is? One 1/2" would feed the kitchen sink and DW, the other 1/2" would feed the only bath, or I would run one 1/2" line from the water heater to feed all of these. One other thought is to run 3/4" to the kitchen, and split off to the bath from there, but this would slow the rate at which I receive hot water to the bathroom. Next question is about the stop valves that feed the sink and toilet. The pipes currently run up into the walls from under the house and then elbow out to the stop valves. I would like to replace the galv pipes in the wall as well, so I am thinking of boring up through the floor under the toilet valve and sink to add a new line to a new inline stop valve, thus leaving the galv in the the wall. Thoughts please. I love constructive criticism by the way.



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Old 12-20-2013, 01:23 AM   #2
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Anyone got any advice?



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Old 12-20-2013, 02:26 AM   #3
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I have absolutely no idea. Perhaps you could have diagrams to show what you're talking about?
I'm not a plumber though. I came here for advice. I didn't want you to feel as if your posts had gone unread though.

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Old 12-20-2013, 03:42 AM   #4
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Leaving the old pipes in the wall is common practice in my neck of the woods. It allows less drywall/plaster damage just to leave the old stuff. Obviously, pull out what you can, even if you need to "Sawzall" the pipe into smaller pieces to allow you to remove it.

Yes, drilling new holes in the floor is also a great idea, just make sure you place the pex in a shroud where it passes the flooring and floor joists.

Regarding your design, Please take a few moments and look at a "home run" designed pex installation, where a manifold is used. This allows equal pressure to all faucets. Another reason for home runs is there is a less chance for embedded leaks, since you start at the manifold, and finish at the end source. Also, utilizing a "home run" system allows you to shut off individual lines, without no disruption to other faucets. Yes, you will use more pex, but that stuff is cheap.

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Old 12-20-2013, 10:42 AM   #5
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Because of the smaller inside diameter of pex compared to copper, I typically run 3/4" pex until I reach the last two fixtures.
Depending on the layout, in order of supply, an example would be:
1. 3/4" to kitchen branching off 1/2" hot and cold to sink.
2. Continue 3/4" to bathroom branching off 1/2" hot and cold to sink.
3. Continue 3/4" cold to toilet and branch off 1/2" supply to toilet and 1/2" cold supply to shower. 1/2" hot to shower after bathroom sink.
The home run system with pex manifold is also a great way repipe and will require more work, but it still depends on the design of the home as to whether or not either way of piping will best suit your needs.

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Old 12-21-2013, 05:34 AM   #6
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Thanks for getting back everyone. I appreciate the shared knowledge.

When I drill up through the floor for the bath sink and toilet feeds, I will use copper, then under the floor it will connect to the pex. That way I don't need to worry about pex getting damaged from chafing or above floor exposure. I should be able to come up with a way to rigidly mount the copper section, so the valve doesn't feel floppy.

I looked up the home run layout, and it looks like the way to go. Hopefully I can get it all run and the crimp rings on correctly.

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Old 12-23-2013, 03:01 AM   #7
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Today my father helped me run the difficult sections of pex through an interior wall. Now I need to go under the house again and hang the pex and get it ready for the "big switch over". I found out that 3/4 pex does not flex very well. I bought some of those metal bend braces, but I think they collapse the tube a little, so I will try not to use them. I suppose if it were summer, and 85 degrees outside, I would expect to see the pex bend easier.

the corrugated copper water heater lines cat the h depot get bad reviews, so anyone tried the stainless braided versions with Success?

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Old 12-23-2013, 03:27 AM   #8
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Yes, stainless braided lines are what you want. I've always used them and besides their price, they are great.



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