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Old 10-05-2013, 11:13 AM   #1
Coltrane
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Default Well water filter confusion

Hello,

Moved into a new house out in the country with well water. There's a pump in the basement along with a sediment filter housing.

Everything seemed normal until we actually looked at it closely and ran some tests. Turns out that only the hot water passes through the filter -- there's another pipe for cold which bypasses it. I'm totally baffled as to why. If you're going to filter anything, wouldn't you filter drinking water? What's the logic behind filtering hot?

Any thoughts would be appreciated. :-)



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Old 10-05-2013, 02:22 PM   #2
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Inline cartridge in my opinion are useless. They only filter particles, not chemicals, iron, hardness, manganese or sulphur. The things that naturally occur in well water. I would remove the cartridge and forget about it. Then if you find that there is something you don't like about the water, such as hardness, or iron staining, have the water tested to see how much of the nuisance there is and deal with it with a "REAL" filter. I would also have the PH tested.



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Old 10-06-2013, 01:59 PM   #3
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Thanks, I'm leaning towards no filter. But the current setup has me curious. Have you ever heard of only filtering hot water?

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Old 10-06-2013, 03:35 PM   #4
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Restaurants do it all the time for dish washing, but I can't imagine why someone would do that in a home.

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Old 10-08-2013, 12:46 AM   #5
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Around here, a decent numbers of farms use them, I know 1 guy that had to clean out his softener every 3 months before we put inline filters on his system.


On the hot only may have been trying to protect something like maybe the dishwasher or hot water heater from surplus build up. Nothing worse then having extra sand particles on your dishes a fine way of wrecking them.

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Old 01-01-2014, 11:27 PM   #6
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Yes, definitely use a sediment filter. I would suggest relocating it so that it covers the whole house though. Sand, sediment, whatever, you don't want it getting into your plumbing. It clogs your faucets, showerheads and whatever else it gets into.
In a previous house, I had a problem with Hydrogen Sulfide smell. I was able to add a second filter canister to hold an activated carbon filter. The carbon did dramatically reduce the smell but were only good for 2-3 weeks. Kind of a pain but I bought the carbon filters by the case so it didn't cost too much.

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Old 01-02-2014, 01:05 PM   #7
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Contrary to popular belief; whole house filters are in tanks the size of softeners not 10" cartridges. If you have a simple water softener tank (9" X 48" or larger) filled 3/4 of the way to the top with carbon, you wouldn't be buying carbon cartridges by the case. You would be going years without messing with the filter at all. A simple in/out head is all that is needed and would pay for itself in a year or so in contrast to the 10" cartridges.

Most people don't know that these so called "whole house filters" were designed one faucet only.

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Old 01-02-2014, 02:37 PM   #8
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Sizing filters should be on a case by case basis.
I have seen some water system that needed a huge filter to catch all the sand and other junk that came through. In other cases, a 10" sediment filter only needs to be changed once a year. My current house has a well the produces really clear water. I don't have a filter or softener.
In the case of the sulfide in the water I mentioned earlier, I am sure I would have moved to a larger filter system eventually but I moved before I got to that point.
Unfortunately, it is difficult to get good advice with residential water treatment. The salesman will push you to buy the thing that give the most profit, not what will fix your water quality issue.

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Old 01-02-2014, 03:23 PM   #9
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I agree, filters should be sized from a water test and for the intended use of the water. I also agree that a lot of softener salesmen will do anything to get you to buy whatever they want you to have.

In a situation where your water is very clean, there would be no use for a cartridge filter in the first place. Wells should not pump sand either. But if they do, there are better ways of dealing with it.

The problem with cartridge filters is they won't remove anything that could harm you. They won't remove hardness or clear water iron. The carbon cartridges will only remove less than a half part of sulphur. They are used as taste and odor filters. But a much larger one would be the wise purchase.

Cartridge filters are a major pet peeve of mine and it just bothers me when I see one in a customers plumbing. It just makes me feel like they got ripped off.



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