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Old 03-17-2013, 04:45 PM   #1
q0987
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Default what is the order to connect the pipe

Hello all,

I am interested in how the gas pipe lines are connected in my house.

Please see the attached image.

Assume I need to reconnect the pipes from scratch, Here is my question

What is the order I should put the pipes?

For example, if I install pipe 1 first, then 2, then 3, then 6 and 7.

How can I tighten 5, 4 and 3 at the same time? I am not sure how the bolt 4 works. It seems to me if I tight 3-4 then I will loose 4-5.

Another question is how I can make sure the order of 3-2-6 is in the up-down order. What if I finally can get 6-2-3 up-down order. what else I can do?
What is the trick here?



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Old 03-17-2013, 04:58 PM   #2
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#4 is a union, with reverse threads on one side of the coupling, and should be your last connection. Yes, you start with #1, then the tee (#2) then work down securing #6 and #7, tighten the #3 nipple, then finally the lower half of the union #4, then secure the top half of the union (#4) to #5, then tighten the union center (#4). Another option is to leave #7 until the last connection, so as to allow the gunk and crap to be allowed to fall out before securing.



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Old 03-17-2013, 06:36 PM   #3
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I saw this video


where the guy only tighten the lower and upper parts of the union. I never saw him tighten the center part.

Is there anything wrong?

Thank you
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Old 03-18-2013, 12:13 AM   #4
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There is nothing wrong with what I saw from his installation, but I can assure you he tightened the union either prior to or after the installation. The video did not show what he used to complete the installation, and I can only presume he used a flexible line.

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Old 03-20-2013, 06:33 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by q0987 View Post
Hello all,

I am interested in how the gas pipe lines are connected in my house.

Please see the attached image.

Assume I need to reconnect the pipes from scratch, Here is my question

What is the order I should put the pipes?

For example, if I install pipe 1 first, then 2, then 3, then 6 and 7.

How can I tighten 5, 4 and 3 at the same time? I am not sure how the bolt 4 works. It seems to me if I tight 3-4 then I will loose 4-5.

Another question is how I can make sure the order of 3-2-6 is in the up-down order. What if I finally can get 6-2-3 up-down order. what else I can do?
What is the trick here?
steps of rejoining gas pipe in your house:

1 Extend your existing gas line by fitting the valves and pipe lengths you need to add a gas line that will reach your new appliance.

2 Use a flexible pipe to connect the end of your new gas line to the appliance.

3 Spread a mixture of water and dish liquid over each seam in your gas line. If bubbles appear, you have a leak. Unscrew that section, strip off the pipe glue, and reattach with new sealant.

4 Turn the gas back on by returning the valve to parallel to the incoming pipe. Test your appliance to ensure the gas is flowing properly.
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Old 03-22-2013, 12:41 AM   #6
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I find this whole thread a bit unsettling...

Go to Home Depot and play around with those same fittings. That should answer all of your questions.

It should be pretty clear as to which area to start with and where to finish.

The purpose if the union is to join two independent sections of piping together. Th last connection will be the union. (With pipe dope on the inside face I hope...)

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Old 03-25-2013, 01:33 AM   #7
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note: sealant is not to be used on the face of the ground joint of a union. threads, yes. face, no.

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Old 03-26-2013, 02:47 AM   #8
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Any connection that seals between two metal surfaces (brass, copper, steel, etc) including compression, flare or unions needs to have pipe dope applied to the face or surface area that is sealing the joint. The threads of a union do not seal the joint, they draw the two separate pieces together.

I also dope the threads which allows the fitting to be more easily disassembled in the future.

I understand that "by design or in theory" you are not required to do so and that the design of the fitting should not need it, but lets be real here... Any plumber with experience knows this is needed.

Thoughts?

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Old 03-26-2013, 03:18 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PioneerPlumber View Post
Any connection that seals between two metal surfaces (brass, copper, steel, etc) including compression, flare or unions needs to have pipe dope applied to the face or surface area that is sealing the joint. The threads of a union do not seal the joint, they draw the two separate pieces together.

I also dope the threads which allows the fitting to be more easily disassembled in the future.

I understand that "by design or in theory" you are not required to do so and that the design of the fitting should not need it, but lets be real here... Any plumber with experience knows this is needed.

Thoughts?
I have been doing it for 50 years and never used pipe dope on ground joints.

John
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Old 03-26-2013, 04:11 AM   #10
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If its residential you can blow through a straw more pressure than what comes out of your gas lines. 7" w.c is so minimal that I've never had to dope them. I don't have a ton of experience by any means but in 3 1/2 years I've never had an issue, but that's just my 2 cents



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