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Old 03-12-2013, 01:54 AM   #1
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Default Sump Pump Discharge to Dry Well

Hi Folks,

I put this here because it seemed like it would be most appropriate section - hope this is OK.

Last year, I installed a new sump basin and pump in my basement. I replaced an existing 'pit' which consisted of a plastic planter and a 1/3hp pump that was discharging into the sewer system, with a Jackel SF15DR Sump Basin and Liberty 457 pump. The new basin capacity is 15 gallons, and the new pump is 1/2hp. I wanted to add the new basin because there was no cover on the old one, and I upped the power of the pump because I re-routed the discharge, and need to lift the water to the ceiling, and out of the house.

Over the summer, when I was working on this project (digging a the hole in the basement) the area was completely dry. I was actually looking forward to some water, so I could see the system operate (be careful what you wish for)! Well, this fall we got a bunch of rain from hurricane Sandy, and a ton of snow on top that this winter. Spring is right around the corner, and the tons of snow in my yard is starting to melt!

The pump has been working fine, and on a couple of occasions, the pump was emptying the basin every 11 minutes. I don't know if this is too much, or OK - I'm not really worried about that yet. I'm trying to figure out what to do with the discharge water. Currently it empties out onto a splash block, and flows out on to the lawn (currently saturating it). I'm considering burying the discharge and digging a dry well. The plan would be to bury a 4" discharge to an NDS Flo-well that would be about 10ft from the house (that's as far away as I can get). The 1 1/2" pump discharge line would have some sort of ice prevention device where it meets the 4" buried line - something like Basement Systems Ice Guard.

I have a couple worries about doing this. Will the volume of water from my pump overwhelm the dry well and become a problem? Is there a way for me to calculate the maximum amount of water in a worse case scenario? Is this even a good idea? I would be putting the water right back in the ground, instead of on the surface where it would have to filter through the soil, and hopefully be absorbed. Any ideas?



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Old 03-12-2013, 04:14 AM   #2
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Don't know if I would pump water from one pit to basically another. If the sump puts out a considerable amount of water and the gound is already wet the ground around the well will become saturated and stop accepting water. I would extend the discharge line to about 10ft from the street curb , bump the discharge up to 2'' outside. Check with city and local codes before discharging water into or close to the street.



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Old 03-12-2013, 01:47 PM   #3
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Another thing to think about is what kind of soil you have in your yard. If it's sand, that's great. If it's clay, water isn't going to soak in and a Dry Well wouldn't work either because the water would have no where to go.

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Old 03-12-2013, 02:39 PM   #4
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Thanks for the replies guys.

I really can't pump it out to the street, because there is a sidewalk in the way. And, I'm not sure what the rules are as far as that goes, but I can try to check. I wonder if I could tie into the city storm drains? I live in New Hampshire, and the soil here isn't clay, but has a lot of rocks! I think it would drain just fine, but I wonder if the water table would just fill the buried well with water? I was reading about some soil test that can be done, but I can't remember what it's called, or how to get one done.

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Old 03-12-2013, 02:46 PM   #5
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The soil test is probably a "Perk Test" that they do before issuing a Septic Tank Permit. At least that's what they did back in the Dark Ages.

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Old 03-12-2013, 03:27 PM   #6
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Speedbump - That's the name I remember seeing. It seems by your response the test is a little dated? Probably not worth it I suppose...

Really, I just want to get this discharge line out of my sight, and I can't think of any other way to do this. It seems my only options are to go the dry well route, or see if I can connect to the city storm drains, but that will probably cost big money, if it's even allowed here.

This Old House landscape contractor Roger Cook installed one in this video, so I figured why not try it myself!

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Old 03-12-2013, 03:56 PM   #7
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You have to remember where the water from the Pump is coming from. The ground under and around your house. So putting the water right back in the ground (if that little Dry Well doesn't fill up first) is just circulating it. You want to get rid of it so your Pump will shut off someday.

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Old 03-12-2013, 07:38 PM   #8
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If the storm drain is on your side of the street you might have a good chance to connect to it. In my old stomping grounds the city did allow you to connect to the storm drain if the drain was on your side of the street , but a licensed plumber had to do the job. A permit had to be pulled and you had to use a approved fitting (inserta tee) to connect to the strom drain.

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Old 03-13-2013, 03:59 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IFIXH20 View Post
If the storm drain is on your side of the street you might have a good chance to connect to it. In my old stomping grounds the city did allow you to connect to the storm drain if the drain was on your side of the street , but a licensed plumber had to do the job. A permit had to be pulled and you had to use a approved fitting (inserta tee) to connect to the strom drain.
I did a little research, and I figured out that, at least in my neighborhood, the sewer system seems to be tied into the storm drains. While it is on my side of the street, I doubt they let people tie into it. I suppose I can try and ask about it.

The water table is high in this area, and I see several people have sumps, including my next door neighbor. They had Basement Systems come in and do the internal weeping, and they simply pump the water out of the house and into a 4" PVC pipe that that goes underground, and pops back up about 3 feet away from the house. It is capped with a grate, so the water just dispenses out onto the front lawn. Of course, in the winter it is buried in snow and ice, and that's where their 'IceGuard' comes into play:

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Old 03-14-2013, 02:41 AM   #10
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Maybe they do things alittle different there, but that's a big no no (tying the storm into sewer) in my area. If your neighbor system works why not do the same. I would extend my discharge more than 3ft. Give the city a call to see if you can tap into the storm drain. a call wouldn't hurt , it might take up a few hrs of your time.



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