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Old 05-30-2011, 01:17 PM   #1
twoskinsoneman
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Default Tapping well line, worried about pressure...

I want to add water to a detached building on my land. Trying to bring it from the existing structure would be near impossible. So I want to tap into the black poly line from the well to the house.
My concern is that because of the elevation difference between the house and the detached building, I am thinking that the pressure in the detached building will be lower than the house because of the head pressure on the line to the house.
What do you think?
I am worried that as I use the water in the detached building the pressure in the house will not equalize with the water in the house. I'm worried that the result will be running out of pressure in the detached building and the pressure switch in the house does not turn on the well pump.



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Old 05-30-2011, 01:31 PM   #2
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I admit I know very little about tapping well lines, but I see a big problem with losing water pressure in your home if something was to go wrong in the detached building. With this being said, I will remain silent until some of the well experts chime in.



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Old 05-30-2011, 01:36 PM   #3
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I am guessing that a check valve is located near the pressure tank. If you tap in before the valve, there is a strong chance that you will lose the prime on the well. (unless there is a foot valve at the end of the well's suction line.) I also doubt you will have any pressure at the new building since the tap is before the pressure tank. Talk to a well person for correct answers. Hope it does work out for you.

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Old 05-30-2011, 01:39 PM   #4
twoskinsoneman
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I have looked for a check valve at the pressure tank. Unless it is internal to the tank which I have never heard of, my assumption is the well pump has the only one.

Any idea of the issue of the water pressure?

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Old 05-31-2011, 12:34 AM   #5
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If I am understanding your drawing correctly, the detached building is 30 feet higher than the house. Every 1' of heighth of water equals .434 PSI of pressure. So, you should have ~ 13 PSI less pressure in the detached building than in your house. So, unless your pressure switch is set extremely low, you should get water at the building at all times, though not at as high a pressure as in your home.

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Old 05-31-2011, 01:17 AM   #6
twoskinsoneman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phishfood View Post
If I am understanding your drawing correctly, the detached building is 30 feet higher than the house. Every 1' of heighth of water equals .434 PSI of pressure. So, you should have ~ 13 PSI less pressure in the detached building than in your house. So, unless your pressure switch is set extremely low, you should get water at the building at all times, though not at as high a pressure as in your home.
Sorry if the drawing is confusing... but yes 30 ft elevation above the house. 13 PSI doesn't seem to bad. I don't know at what psi my switch calls the pump.... what is typical?
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Old 05-31-2011, 01:22 AM   #7
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30 to 40 PSI is what I would expect most pressure switches to turn on at. One of our resident well guys will probably confirm or correct me.

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Old 05-31-2011, 11:29 AM   #8
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The well line is black poly. Im figuring on a barbed tee with crimp rings. Is this the most reliable connection type?

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Old 05-31-2011, 04:37 PM   #9
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Barb fittings are fine, but use stainless, galvanized or brass. Two hose clamps, quality counts here too.

You need no tank in the detached building, no check valves anywhere but in the well and like Phisfood said, there will only be 13 lbs difference. You could crank up the switch to solve that problem.

If you have a submersible pump, there should be no shortage of pressure when two people are using water as long as it's not more than the pump can keep up with.

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Old 05-31-2011, 05:28 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by speedbump View Post
Barb fittings are fine, but use stainless, galvanized or brass. Two hose clamps, quality counts here too.

You need no tank in the detached building, no check valves anywhere but in the well and like Phisfood said, there will only be 13 lbs difference. You could crank up the switch to solve that problem.

If you have a submersible pump, there should be no shortage of pressure when two people are using water as long as it's not more than the pump can keep up with.
I thought about raising the press a little but I'm terrified afraid of the polybutylene pipe in my house. I have read all the stories and law suits about the stuff. I was young and dumb when I bought the house and didn't know the time bomb I had. No leaks yet but the thought of raising the pressure seems like tempting fate.

No need for the tank? That's helpful. I was a little worried being so close to the well pump I might have surges at the detached building when the pump runs.

Thanks for the help!


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