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Old 01-03-2011, 03:17 AM   #1
amadogon49
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Default Kitchen sink venting...

Hello,

First, happy new year to all.

I'm in the middle of doing a kitchen remodel, and due to the location I've chosen for the sink, which will sit under a window, which is on an exterior wall, I won't be able to simply extend the trap arm in the wall, due to the location of the studs that support the window header. (see picture).

My plan is to run the trap arm flush in front of the studs/drywall, inside the cabinet, it would run about 4-5 feet, within code, for a 2" pipe. At this point it would turn back into the wall to connect to a vertical revent/drain. The revent would be 1 1/2", and the drain itsef would be 2". Would I affect the trap in anyway, based on the length of the trap arm, and/or the turn I would have to make back into the wall to connect to the vertical pipe? Once I'm connected back into the wall the vent itself would attach to an another vent stack, which, in turn connects to a horizontal vent branch one floor above, and eventually, to the main stack, and out the roof. The drain would need to go about 10 feet to connect to another 2" drain which in turn connects to the main soil stack in the basement. (see picture).

I posted most of the questions in the picture attached, but in essense:

1) Is the design sound?
2) The type of fittings I would need at the various junction points in the vent and drain sections?
3) Is the sizing for the drain/vents correct?
4) The length of the vents and drains, is this within appropriate limits based on the design.
5) Are there any minimum height requirements on the venting that I need to follow?

Here's the link (if using IE, you can simply press the left mouse button to ZOOM into the picture):

http://img87.imageshack.us/img87/2171/reventsink.jpg

I also, in the process of coming up with the above questions, found this site:

Trap arm - learn about dirty arms with this plumbing diagram.

which details what I'm proposing on doing (a dirty drain rough-in), vs a standard rough-in. Can anyone tell me the advantages/disadvantages of using either of these designs?

In particular I don't have too much space below the window, and based on what I've been reading a standard rough-in requires a certain amount of space above the flood level of the sink for it to work. Is this correct?


Thanks,
Amado



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Old 01-04-2011, 12:24 AM   #2
phishfood
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If I am correctly understanding your diagram, the only code question I have is what it the stack that you are attaching the kitchen drain to in the basement used for currently?

The "plumbing correct" designation for the sanitary tee that you will use to attach the trap arm to the stack is 2" x 1 1/2' X 2". Denote the outlet of the tee first, than the other end of the run of the tee, and then the branch of the tee. More than you needed to know, but hey.

Yes, the fitting to turn the trap arm back parallel with the wall should be a sweep. A long sweep fitting is preferable, but a short sweep will work and meets the code that I work under.

The change of directions in the vent section can be done with vent ells, short sweeps, long sweeps, 1/8 bends, etc. Tie back into the vent stack with an upside down sanitary tee.

The code that I work under specifically does not allow horizontal vents unless the centerline of the vent pipe is at least 6" above the flood over rim of the fixture. No exceptions are made for using drainage fittings in place of vent fitting. So yes, your final question is correct, at least in my area.



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Old 01-04-2011, 01:28 AM   #3
amadogon49
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Hey phishfood, thanks for the reply. The vent/drain that is being connected to, used to be used by the previous kitchen sink, and a lavatory on the upper floor, but now, both have been removed, and moved respectively, so this vertical stack is not being used by anything currently.

Do you reside in NJ? What code does your area follow? What part of the code would address that height requirment for the horizontal vent?

Thanks,
Amado

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Old 01-04-2011, 02:10 AM   #4
phishfood
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Well, that clears up the fixture load issue, since the stack will be serving less fixtures than previously.

We have the Florida Standard Plumbing Code. It is modeled after either the International or the Universal, I don't remember which at the moment.

The most current edition that I have is 2004, though there is a newer, adopted edition out.

905.4 Vertical rise of vent

Every dry vent shall rise vertically to a minimum of 6 inches above the flood level rim of the highest trap or trapped fixture being vented.
905.4 Vertical rise of vent

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