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Old 08-13-2013, 08:56 PM   #1
RossA
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Default Need Faucet Advice

I want (need) to replace my kitchen faucet with something that has a higher flow rate. City water pressure isn't a problem, other faucets in the house run fine. Plenty of flow to kitchen supply lines, so that's not the problem. It's just the danged new lower flow faucets.
Here is what I am looking for:
Single mounting hole
Pull out spray head
Brushed nickel
Single control handle
LOTS and LOTS of water!

I've considered a commercial faucet, but most of them don't have one or more of my other requirements (wife's requirements).

Alternatively, would love to find something with the above features that I can modify to increase flow rate.

I can't be the only guy out there wanting more water.

Free beer for life to whoever can help. Thanks



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Old 08-14-2013, 01:29 AM   #2
phishfood
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What kind of beer?



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Old 08-14-2013, 01:50 AM   #3
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The problem that you are running in to is that federal law dictates the maximum flow of water for a faucet to 2.2 gallons per minute to all manufacturers in the US. Any imports are required to follow the same restrictions to be allowed to distribute in the US. As others have stated on other posts relating to the issue, you would have to remove the flow restrictor to increase your actual flow rate.
What a lot of people experience when doing this to a kitchen or bathroom faucet...and sometimes to the shower head, but not as often...is an undesirable change to the dynamic of the water flow.
Most professional plumbers will not recommend removal of the flow restrictor based on ethics and principals. I am one of those plumbers, but I do feel your pain.
Let's get back to dynamics and performance. That's actually what people are complaining about. I had an old Delta in my house when I bought it and when I upgraded it I installed a Moen Castleby with pull out sprayer. The flow rate was the same, but the dynamic of the sprayer was ideal for truly rinsing dishes clean from my experience with them. I know that model doesn't fit your criteria, just using it as an example.
So, my question to help you and the others on this forum to find a solution for your problem is this; Do you really need more volume or is it more of a performance issue with your current faucet?

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Old 08-14-2013, 01:54 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phishfood View Post
What kind of beer?
...And somebody cast a line out and reel phish back in. Saying 'beer' to him is like saying 'treat' to a dog.(...just kidding, phish.)
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Old 08-14-2013, 03:19 AM   #5
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I guess that I should add that there are other factors that may effect the performance of your faucet regardless of the make or model. Do you have an older house with galvanized steel water pipes? Are the main trunk lines 1/2" or 3/4" so that you have adequate volume to reduce pressure drops? Do you know what your pressure actually is? Do you have an adjustable regulator? Let us know a few of these details, also.

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Old 08-14-2013, 03:22 PM   #6
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1/2" galvanized lines, but the pressure is good everywhere else. As a matter of fact, before we remodeled the kitchen and we had ancient faucets there, we had great pressure, so I suspect that it's just a faucet issue. If I knew how to remove the restrictor, I could try that, and if it messes up the dynamics of the flow, I could put it back in.
BTW, beer of choice to whoever can solve this!

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Old 08-14-2013, 09:41 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RossA View Post
1/2" galvanized lines


BTW, beer of choice to whoever can solve this!

Solved!
.....................
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Old 08-15-2013, 04:13 PM   #8
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Uuuhhh, Ok, help me out here. If the lines are the problem, then why do I have great pressure everywhere else? It's not like I have 1/2" galvanized in the kitchen, and 3/4" PVC everywhere else.
What am I missing?

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Old 08-15-2013, 06:25 PM   #9
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Galvanized lines can build up with rust particles. When the water is turned off for any reason then turned back on these particles can become loose and lodge in the line causing to become plugged. It's time to replace the galvanized lines.

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Old 08-15-2013, 09:37 PM   #10
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Ross, consider your plumbing as a huge tree trunk. The base of the tree is your incoming water source. The leaves of the tree are your faucets. When a chunk of iron or calcium breaks off from the galvanized pipes, it heads towards the leaves, and will sometimes become lodged at the valve. Many times you can test by disconnecting the supply lines to the faucet, and checking the pressure. If you still have great pressure at the supply lines, chances are your faucet may have become plugged with sediment.



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